among today’s communists

My grandfather grandfather was arrested because he opposed collectivisation. Father had to flee the village and hide at a relative’s in Dobrudja. He was a law student at the time and was forced to abandon his degree. It was only years later that he was able to return to society and continue his studies, this

My grandfather grandfather was arrested because he opposed collectivisation. Father had to flee the village and hide at a relative’s in Dobrudja. He was a law student at the time and was forced to abandon his degree. It was only years later that he was able to return to society and continue his studies, this time as a student at the Academy of Economics.

It was not until the beginning of 2014 that I was able to take part, as a photographer, in the commemorations to mark the birthday of the late dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. I had wanted to do this since 2011, but I had always been busy elsewhere on the day in question.

I was shocked by what I saw there and it took me more than a month before I realised that I wanted to get to know better the people who want to be the direct descendants of those who trampled underfoot the lives of my family and twenty million other Romanians. Ultimately, the victim in me could not resist the temptation to get to know the aggressor. And I could not have made a better decision.

And so it was that I met the tenth-hand communists, whose masters have left them not just outside the door but lightyears away from the post-revolution trough, people who have not been able to exist outside the old system of relations in their raw form, individuals who some might suggest have not been put in a mental hospital only because their behaviour is relatively placid.

I told them from the outset that I was going to express my own feelings about my experiences with them, but I promised them that I would also let them make their own voices heard. Nobody can present you better than you can present yourself.

Mankind saw the victims of communism and was unimpressed. The living presents the aggressors and let you decide whether you can identify with them.

Comrade Petre Ignatencu, the new leader of the Romanian Communist Party and a taxi driver in his 60s, did not manage to become a party member before 1989, even though it was his ardent desire. This could be a considered a failure, given that many Romanians were forced to become members against their will. For him, the collapse of communism in Romania a quarter of a century ago this December was a grave mistake.

For years, the former Securitate sub-officer has taken it upon himself to lay wreaths at the graves of Romania’s communist-era leaders, as well as visit the sites of key episodes in the country’s communist past to lay flowers. Now he’s hoping to officially revive the Party, with himself as the new leader.

Yet before they can do this they have to overcome the legal barriers; it is currently illegal in Romania to form an official communist party able to compete in elections.

Over the last few years a small group of Romanians, most of them elderly and some, like Ignatencu, former members of the security apparatus, have been pushing to reconnect the country with its communist past.

The group includes people like Gheorghe Zbaganu, a maths professor at Bucharest University who recites Cuban poetry, pays his tithe to the party and is a constant presence at events, Liviu Lungu, a 53-year-old IT engineer who moved to Australia after the revolution but returned to Romania disappointed by Western capitalism, and Gheorghe Ungureanu, a 75-year-old retired professor who previously founded a Communist Party that would only admit those who hadn’t been members of the party before 1989 (it didn’t attract many members). At best the group numbers three hundred people, with only a fraction of those turning up to events regularly.

In June, the group settled into their first ever office, two rooms donated to them by a friendly political party in a rundown villa in Bucharest; the group had been unable to afford the rent on office space before, which had impacted on their ability to gather and hold meetings.

At the inauguration around a dozen people attended. The Internationale was played, and pictures of Marx and Lenin were prominently displayed alongside former Romanian communist leaders Nicolae Ceausescu and Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej.

For most Romanians, Ceausescu and his wife, Elena -­ both executed a quarter of a century ago, on Christmas Day 1989 – remain villains who ruled over a dictatorial police state and put the country’s development back decades. Last year three former government officials, including Alexandru Visinescu, were indicted in Romania, accused of genocide related to communist-era crimes.

Yet for Ignatencu and the others like him the former communist top brass, especially Ceausescu, were leaders who ruled during a better time. The group see themselves as the continuation of the earlier Communist Party, yet they are not delusional, nor imagining a return to previous times; instead, they simply want to be able to have their voices heard.

“Romania claims to be a democracy but many democratic countries allow far-right or communist parties. Surely it is up to the people to vote for us or not,” says Ignatencu.

A few months ago Ignatencu sent a dossier to the European Court in Strasburg to contest the ban and be allowed to set up the party and compete in elections. They are still waiting to hear back.

The discourse of Comrade Ignatencu never ceases to amaze me. As if lifted directly from the old textbooks of political economy and the archives of Party congresses, this discourse no longer sounds as impassioned as it did in 1945, however. In his eyes, the Communist Party is inseparable from the State; it is the guiding force and the only solution for real progress that will lead to man’s self-fulfilment through labour, unlike capitalism, which is only interested in profit. People expect the head of state to solve their problems and so the communist leader must be invested with the necessary power to be able to meet this expectation. The leader must have absolute powers. The end justifies the means.

Comrade Ignatencu does not believe that property should be sacred if it prevents the Party from achieving a particular end.

The leader of the new Romanian Communist Party has three priorities in life: the Party, his work, and his wife – in that order. He himself says that, the Party forbid, if his wife should desire a different position in the pecking order, then she “would lose out, from the very start.”

Ignatencu even accepts the Party’s dark past. In his opinion, the Party cannot be held responsible for the crimes of its members. Not that there were any great crimes in the communist period, and certainly no crimes against humanity in his opinion. The communists were trying to build a new society and such a society couldn’t come about by asking people nicely, smoothly and without suffering.

But to give you an idea of what communism means, the following is from a discussion I had with Petre, on the subjects of children’s education and human rights:
“When you educate a child, do you ask him whether he likes it? Do you ask the child what he wants to do and what he wants to learn? That would be degradation. The child learns what you teach him, because you prepare his future for him. In his old age the man will be the way you educated him as a child. You educate the child. The child has to know that he is obligated to do what he has to do, not necessarily because he wants to do it. But in this country the wheel has turned, because up until 1990 children knew that they had to study at school, that they had to go to school, and that they had to work after that. What do children learn nowadays? They learn to get their own way don’t they? They are taught to phone the child protection services if their parents or teachers clip their ears. That’s what children are taught. They aren’t taught to be civilised.
Nobody lays a finger on children who are educated at school and are civilised. It’s the hooligans who don’t want to learn who get punished. What are you supposed to do with a child who doesn’t want to learn? Just leave him like that? He’s the one who will end up hitting you on the head. You’re obligated to use less orthodox means. When a mother beats her child she doesn’t do it because she doesn’t love him. She beats him because he’s cheeky, because he doesn’t do as he’s told. A child also needs to learn the meaning of fear . . .”

He’s right: we all knew the meaning of fear, thanks to the repressive apparatus of the
Communist Party, fear of informers and fear of those in charge. That fear left us without any backbone; it paralysed us for at least four generations. It taught us to live with our heads bowed, and that’s why many of us even today don’t know that there is a sky above, the sun and the stars.

“Socialism was defeated in the region, at least in Russia, because it lost the media war. The communists were presented as evil. They go on about human rights, but I’ve never heard them say what human rights. What rights? The right to a fair trial? The right to health? Once I had an argument with a citizen who said he got arrested for just talking. How about that! You talked? Did anybody stop you talking? Of course not. They arrested you because you said what you weren’t supposed to. We have to draw the distinction. Because otherwise nobody would have punished you for it. Those were the rules. Ceausescu was a stickler for the law. He didn’t do anything unless he was legally covered for it. But now they say he was a dictator. The real dictator is the one who does whatever he likes.”

He’s right there, too: the communists didn’t kill you for just talking, but for what you said. Nothing could be truer. The communists let you talk, as long as you said what they wanted to hear. Freedom of speech was the freedom to express the will of the Party, but such nuances are too subtle for Comrade Ignatencu. With reference to the famous Leninist dictum: “If you are unable, we will help you, if you do not know, we will teach you, if you do not want to, we will force you,” Comrade Ignatencu asks, rhetorically: “How was the Party to blame if eighty percent of the Romanian population put the communists in the position of having to force them? But they forced them to do good, to learn, to be disciplined. And the ones who opposed, the ones who shirked, were sent to the Canal, to Gherla Prison.”

My grandfather opposed and he ended up in a communist prison. Whatever Comrade Ignatencu might say, I don’t believe that my grandfather forced the Communist Party to take away his freedom.

Petre Țuțea, a famous Romanian philosopher, once said: “With your left hand, you can’t even make the sign of the cross, let alone run a country.”

I say that there is no greater crime than to forbid a man from achieving his maximum
potential just because society decides for him how much he needs and above all how much he is allowed to want.

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    ROMANIA, Bucharest : Two people place the national flag over the late Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena’s new grave at the Ghencea cemetery in Bucharest, during a commemoration of his 96th birthday, on Sunday Jan. 26 2014. The bodies of executed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were reburied late December 8, 2010 nearly five months after they were exhumed for tests to confirm their identity. Ceausescu and his wife were executed by firing squad on December 25, 1989, following an anti-communist popular uprising and summary trial.

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    ROMANIA, Bucharest : Two people place the national flag over the late Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena’s new grave at the Ghencea cemetery in Bucharest, during a commemoration of his 96th birthday, on Sunday Jan. 26 2014. The bodies of executed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were reburied late

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    The Romanian National Television, one of the most important symbols of the Romanian revolution, as seen in Bucharest on February 19, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    The Romanian National Television, one of the most important symbols of the Romanian revolution, as seen in Bucharest on February 19, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), leaving the commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), leaving the commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Ion Hotinceanu (L), the president of the Romanian-Cuban friendship association ‘Jose Marti’, Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and Petre Ignatencu, attending a commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Ion Hotinceanu (L), the president of the Romanian-Cuban friendship association ‘Jose Marti’, Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and Petre Ignatencu, attending a commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), welcoming his wife at the airport upon her return from a working visit to Paris, as seen on February 11, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), welcoming his wife at the airport upon her return from a working visit to Paris, as seen on February 11, 2014.

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking on the phone, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking on the phone, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), meets with the son in law of the late communist sculptor Spiridon Georgescu (died in 1974), as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. Wanting to get rid of some of the old sculptures, artist’s son in law contacted Mr. Ignatencu an offered as a donation the statues of Marks, Engels and former Romanian communist leader Gheorghe Gheorghiu Dej. Lacking a party headquarters at that time, Mr. Ignatencu accepted the donation but asked for the statues to be deposited in the same warehouse until he could sort out where to take them. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), meets with the son in law of the late communist sculptor Spiridon Georgescu (died in 1974), as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. Wanting to get rid of some of the old sculptures, artist’s son in law contacted Mr.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, having cake and tea prepared by his wife, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, having cake and tea prepared by his wife, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently returned to Romania where he frequently attends events organized by the Romanian Communist Party lead by Mr. Petre Ignatencu.

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently

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    Family pictures, as seen in Ceausescu’s parents house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly created Socialist Man. So, in 1988, he began his plan by demolishing the traditional village houses and replacing them with apartment buildings, and changed the status of the place from village to city.

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    Family pictures, as seen in Ceausescu’s parents house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, at work, as seen in Bucharest on February 1, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, at work, as seen in Bucharest on February 1, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December,

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver posses for the camera holding the portrait of Che at the end of the commemoration marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver posses for the camera holding the portrait of Che at the end of the commemoration marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the

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    Picture depicting young Alexandrina, Ceausescu’s mother, as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly created Socialist Man. So, in 1988, he began his plan by demolishing the traditional village houses and replacing them with apartment buildings, and changed the status of the place from village to city.

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    Picture depicting young Alexandrina, Ceausescu’s mother, as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, meeting with a woman at a local bar near his apartment, as seen in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, meeting with a woman at a local bar near his apartment, as seen in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which

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    Wall of fame, as seen at the PCR improvised headquarters in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Wall of fame, as seen at the PCR improvised headquarters in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania

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    Ceausescu’s statue in front of his parent’s house in Scornicesti, as seen on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly created Socialist Man. So, in 1988, he began his plan by demolishing the traditional village houses and replacing them with apartment buildings, and changed the status of the place from village to city.

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    Ceausescu’s statue in front of his parent’s house in Scornicesti, as seen on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house

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    Georgian Constantin, a Communist Party member gestures inside his apartment were he invited Mr. Petre Ignatencu and his wife to cook the fish he bought, as seen on April 13, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Georgian Constantin, a Communist Party member gestures inside his apartment were he invited Mr. Petre Ignatencu and his wife to cook the fish he bought, as seen on April 13, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on

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    Picture depicting young Ceausescu (M), as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly created Socialist Man. So, in 1988, he began his plan by demolishing the traditional village houses and replacing them with apartment buildings, and changed the status of the place from village to city.

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    Picture depicting young Ceausescu (M), as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to

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    In this July 18, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu holds a photograph showing him as a child at his home in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    In this July 18, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu holds a photograph showing him as a child at his home in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, going through paperwork, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, going through paperwork, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10,

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other communist nostalgics attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other communist nostalgics attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania

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    Iacov Ion, PAS vice-president attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Iacov Ion, PAS vice-president attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted

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    Woman waiting for Mr. Ignatencu, as seen in Bucharest in front of the Venezuelan Embassy on April 11, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Woman waiting for Mr. Ignatencu, as seen in Bucharest in front of the Venezuelan Embassy on April 11, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the

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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union was done through Sighet.
    In August 1948, once communist power had been consolidated in Romania, Sighet prison was reserved for political opponents of the regime. At first, it held a group of students, pupils and peasants from the Maramureş region. Many of the surviving prisoners are still living in Sighet to this very day. On the night of May 5, 1950, over one hundred former dignitaries from the whole country were brought to the Sighet penitentiary (former ministers and other politicians, as well as academics, economists, military officers, historians, and journalists), some of them sentenced to heavy punishments, and others held without any form of trial. The majority were over 60 years old. Many important figures of inter-war Romania died in custody, including the leader of the National Peasants’ Party and former Prime Minister of Romania, Iuliu Maniu.

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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union

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    Romanian Army General Marin Dragnea (M), retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Romanian Army General Marin Dragnea (M), retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle

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    Romanian Army General Marin Dragnea, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Romanian Army General Marin Dragnea, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against

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    Petre Ignatencu and other retired communism nostalgics commemorating the railway workers strike at Grivita in 1933, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu and other retired communism nostalgics commemorating the railway workers strike at Grivita in 1933, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, showing a anti-monarchy banner, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, showing a anti-monarchy banner, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March

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    Petre Igntencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, purchasing a commemorative floral arrangement, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Igntencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, purchasing a commemorative floral arrangement, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, having cake and tea prepared by his wife, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, having cake and tea prepared by his wife, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, doing his morning exercise routine, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, doing his morning exercise routine, as seen inside his apartment in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attends the baptism ceremony of the son of a communist party member, as seen inside Casin Church in Bucharest on September 20, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attends the baptism ceremony of the son of a communist party member, as seen inside Casin Church in Bucharest on September 20, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently returned to Romania where he frequently attends events organized by the Romanian Communist Party lead by Mr. Petre Ignatencu.

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently

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    Retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu poses holding a photograph showing him as a child and the couple, right, that adopted him after his mother Line, left, could no longer afford raising him, at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    Retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu poses holding a photograph showing him as a child and the couple, right, that adopted him after his mother Line, left, could no longer afford raising him, at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for

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    Communist block near the house of Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Communist block near the house of Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales (R) attending a commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales (R) attending a commemoration ceremony organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, marking the birth of the Cuban poet Jose Marti, as seen in Bucharest on February 13, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), after laying a funeral flowers arrangement to commemorate the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants upraising was relocated in Parcul Florilor on October 2007. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), after laying a funeral flowers arrangement to commemorate the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants upraising was relocated in Parcul Florilor on October 2007. In

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle

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    Petre Ignatencu (with the back to the camera), a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), watching as a party member lays a funeral flowers arrangement to commemorate the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants upraising was relocated in Parcul Florilor on October 2007. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (with the back to the camera), a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), watching as a party member lays a funeral flowers arrangement to commemorate the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants

  • photos 44 of 89
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    Emilia Goldhagen plays on Youtube the famous song “Hasta Siempre Comandante” during the commemorations marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Emilia Goldhagen plays on Youtube the famous song “Hasta Siempre Comandante” during the commemorations marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December,

  • photos 45 of 89
    _47X5188 (mugur varzariu) fullscreen

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    Comrade Coicu Alexandru, the editor of the communist newspaper Scanteia, talking to comrade Petre Ignatencu, the communist party president, about the upcoming edition, as seen in Bucharest on September 23, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Comrade Coicu Alexandru, the editor of the communist newspaper Scanteia, talking to comrade Petre Ignatencu, the communist party president, about the upcoming edition, as seen in Bucharest on September 23, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attends the baptism ceremony of the son of a communist party member, as seen inside Casin Church in Bucharest on September 20, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attends the baptism ceremony of the son of a communist party member, as seen inside Casin Church in Bucharest on September 20, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae

  • photos 47 of 89
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    Romanian Veterans, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Romanian Veterans, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the

  • photos 48 of 89
    Blocks of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014. fullscreen

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    Blocks of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014.
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    Blocks of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014.
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    Blocks of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014.

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    The pedestal of a Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future stands tall near the graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944, as seen on April 25, 2014.

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    The pedestal of a Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future stands tall near the graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944, as seen on April 25,

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    Former Romanian dictator’s name tag Ceausescu, as seen in the windshield of an utility vehicle ready to dismantle the ferris wheel in Herastrau Park, on April 29, 2014.

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    Former Romanian dictator’s name tag Ceausescu, as seen in the windshield of an utility vehicle ready to dismantle the ferris wheel in Herastrau Park, on April 29, 2014.

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    In this July 18, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu holds a photograph showing him as a child at his home in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    In this July 18, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu holds a photograph showing him as a child at his home in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners

  • photos 52 of 89
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    Picture depicting Ceausescu’s parents, Alexandra and Andruta, as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model town to house the newly created Socialist Man. So, in 1988, he began his plan by demolishing the traditional village houses and replacing them with apartment buildings, and changed the status of the place from village to city.

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    Picture depicting Ceausescu’s parents, Alexandra and Andruta, as seen in his parent’s house in Scornicesti on August 6, 2014. Scornicești was the birthplace of communist leader Nicolae Ceaușescu, who lived here until the age of 11, when he left for Bucharest to become a shoemaker. During his dictatorship, Ceaușescu wanted to make Scornicești a model

  • photos 53 of 89
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    The communist flag hanging out the window of Gheorghe Ungureanu’s apartment and party headquarter, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    The communist flag hanging out the window of Gheorghe Ungureanu’s apartment and party headquarter, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his

  • photos 54 of 89
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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union was done through Sighet.
    In August 1948, once communist power had been consolidated in Romania, Sighet prison was reserved for political opponents of the regime. At first, it held a group of students, pupils and peasants from the Maramureş region. Many of the surviving prisoners are still living in Sighet to this very day. On the night of May 5, 1950, over one hundred former dignitaries from the whole country were brought to the Sighet penitentiary (former ministers and other politicians, as well as academics, economists, military officers, historians, and journalists), some of them sentenced to heavy punishments, and others held without any form of trial. The majority were over 60 years old. Many important figures of inter-war Romania died in custody, including the leader of the National Peasants’ Party and former Prime Minister of Romania, Iuliu Maniu.

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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union

  • photos 55 of 89
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    In this July 21, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu look out his home window in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    In this July 21, 2014, photo, retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu look out his home window in Bucharest, Romania. For the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s

  • photos 56 of 89
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    A photograph depicting a 1981 calendar belonging to retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu is displayed at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    A photograph depicting a 1981 calendar belonging to retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu is displayed at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes

  • photos 57 of 89
    MugurVarzariu_COMMUNISTS_LiviuLungu_0010 fullscreen

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently returned to Romania where he frequently attends events organized by the Romanian Communist Party lead by Mr. Petre Ignatencu.

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    Home at 53 years old Liviu Lungu a Material Science and Engineering graduate, as seen on August 20, 2014. Mr. Lungu immigrated soon after the fall of communism in December 1989 and he is now both an Australian and a Romanian citizen. Failing to identify with the democratic values of the West, Mr. Lungu recently

  • photos 58 of 89
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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union was done through Sighet.
    In August 1948, once communist power had been consolidated in Romania, Sighet prison was reserved for political opponents of the regime. At first, it held a group of students, pupils and peasants from the Maramureş region. Many of the surviving prisoners are still living in Sighet to this very day. On the night of May 5, 1950, over one hundred former dignitaries from the whole country were brought to the Sighet penitentiary (former ministers and other politicians, as well as academics, economists, military officers, historians, and journalists), some of them sentenced to heavy punishments, and others held without any form of trial. The majority were over 60 years old. Many important figures of inter-war Romania died in custody, including the leader of the National Peasants’ Party and former Prime Minister of Romania, Iuliu Maniu.

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    The prison in Sighetu Marmaţiei (often referred to just as “Sighet”) was built in 1897, when the area was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, as a prison for criminal offenders. After 1945, at the end of World War II, the repatriation of Romanians who had been prisoners of war and deportees in the Soviet Union

  • photos 59 of 89
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    A photograph showing retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu is displayed at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    A photograph showing retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu is displayed at his home in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24,

  • photos 60 of 89
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    The graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944 are found beside a typically Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future, as seen in Bucharest on April 25, 2014.

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    The graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944 are found beside a typically Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future, as seen in Bucharest on April 25,

  • photos 61 of 89
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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), gets interviewed by an online TV station, as seen on March 18, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), gets interviewed by an online TV station, as seen on March 18, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December,

  • photos 62 of 89
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    A Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future stands tall near the graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944, as seen on April 25, 2014.

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    A Soviet statue of a brave soldier carrying the red flag towards a bright socialist future stands tall near the graves of a few hundred soldiers of the Soviet Union, killed in the brief period of fighting that preceded the Red Army’s march into Bucharest in 1944, as seen on April 25, 2014.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, looking out his apartment and party headquarter window, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, looking out his apartment and party headquarter window, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded

  • photos 65 of 89
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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking about the greatness of Romania compared to the decadence of the West, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking about the greatness of Romania compared to the decadence of the West, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on

  • photos 66 of 89
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    Petre Ignatencu’s image reflected in a framed picture of Che Guevara, at the end of the commemorations marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu’s image reflected in a framed picture of Che Guevara, at the end of the commemorations marking the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on

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    Emilia Goldhagen (L), Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, the Cuban Ambassador (L) and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Emilia Goldhagen (L), Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, the Cuban Ambassador (L) and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales (third from the left), ready to leave at the end of the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Her Excellency, the Cuban Ambassador Ms. Nieves Iliana Hernandez Portales (third from the left), ready to leave at the end of the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since

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    Petre Igntencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Igntencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver attending the third campaign ’5 days for the 5 imprisoned in Washington DC’ organized by the Cuban Embassy in Romania, as seen in Bucharest on June 04, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since

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    Pictures depicting Lenin and former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu on the shelves of Gheorghe Ungureanu, a retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Pictures depicting Lenin and former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu on the shelves of Gheorghe Ungureanu, a retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges,

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, training indoors in an attempt to join the Romanian kayak old boys team, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, training indoors in an attempt to join the Romanian kayak old boys team, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), meets with the son in law of the late communist sculptor Spiridon Georgescu (died in 1974), as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. Wanting to get rid of some of the old sculptures, artist’s son in law contacted Mr. Ignatencu an offered as a donation the statues of Marks, Engels and former Romanian communist leader Gheorghe Gheorghiu Dej. Lacking a party headquarters at that time, Mr. Ignatencu accepted the donation but asked for the statues to be deposited in the same warehouse until he could sort out where to take them. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), meets with the son in law of the late communist sculptor Spiridon Georgescu (died in 1974), as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. Wanting to get rid of some of the old sculptures, artist’s son in law contacted Mr.

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    Dinca Dumitru showing his RCP membership card he received the same day as Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Dinca Dumitru showing his RCP membership card he received the same day as Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the

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    Petre Ignatencu (M-R), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (M-R), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver and other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In

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    Georgian Constantin Nicolae (68) arranging the communist flag as other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Georgian Constantin Nicolae (68) arranging the communist flag as other Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate Russians victory against Nazi Germany and the end of the World War II in Europe, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), training for the kayak veterans competitions, as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), training for the kayak veterans competitions, as seen in Bucharest, on March 19, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking about the greatness of Romania compared to the decadence of the West, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on February 20, 2014. He founded the party on March 10, 1996 but the Court refused to accept the registration. Ten years later the European Court for Human Rights ruled in his favor accusing Romania of violating the right to free association. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghe Ungureanu, retired teacher, political victim of the former communism regime and the founder of the Romanian Communist Party with members that prior to 1989 where never part of the former PCR, talking about the greatness of Romania compared to the decadence of the West, as seen inside his apartment in Curtea de Arges, on

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    A block of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014.

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    A block of Communist-era flats, as seen in Bucharest, Romania on April 29, 2014.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party) and his wife Emilia Goldhagen cooking fish, home at Mr. Georgian Constantin, a party member that bought fish and invited Mr. Ignatencu to prepare it, as seen on April 13, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party) and his wife Emilia Goldhagen cooking fish, home at Mr. Georgian Constantin, a party member that bought fish and invited Mr. Ignatencu to prepare it, as seen on April 13, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu (not seen), the leader of the New Romanian Communist Party, a former kayaker and currently a taxi driver, attending PAS plenary session, as seen inside Europa cinema in Bucharest on October 11, 2014. PAS president Constantin Rotaru is one of the 14 candidates running for presidency in November 2014 elections. In 2014 Romania

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    The statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants upraising was relocated in Parcul Florilor on October 2007. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    The statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants uprising, as seen on March 9, 2014. Formerly displayed at Obor square, the statue dedicated to the 1907 peasants upraising was relocated in Parcul Florilor on October 2007. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against

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    People taking pictures as Romanian Veterans, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    People taking pictures as Romanian Veterans, retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae Ceausescu’s dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against Ceausescu’s

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), gets interviewed by an online TV station, as seen on March 18, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Petre Ignatencu, a taxi driver and the president of the new PCR (Romanian Communist Party), gets interviewed by an online TV station, as seen on March 18, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December,

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    Gheorghita Zbaganu, a university math teacher turning on the projector as seen during class, at the University of Bucharest, on March 5, 2014. Mr. Zbaganu frequently attends new PCR party meetings and commemorations as a prominent supporter. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghita Zbaganu, a university math teacher turning on the projector as seen during class, at the University of Bucharest, on March 5, 2014. Mr. Zbaganu frequently attends new PCR party meetings and commemorations as a prominent supporter. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide

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    The monument commemorating the railway workers strike at Grivita in 1933, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    The monument commemorating the railway workers strike at Grivita in 1933, as seen in Bucharest on February 16, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the

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    Gheorghita Zbaganu, PAS vice-president and Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Gheorghita Zbaganu, PAS vice-president and Romanian Communist Party members gather at their improvised headquarters to commemorate the birth of Che Guevara, as seen in Bucharest on June 14, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21

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    Romanian soldiers handling the Russian sympathy flowers arrangement, as retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship. The country-wide struggle against CeausescuÕs regime erupted on the 21 December, when a speech of Ceausescu in front of the central committee of the Communist Party was interrupted by jeers from the crowd. People stayed on the street and started fighting. More than 1,000 died and over 3,000 were wounded all over Romania. Piata Universitatii in Bucharest became one of the symbols of the revolution.

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    Romanian soldiers handling the Russian sympathy flowers arrangement, as retired communism nostalgics, Russian Embassy, Romanian Veterans, and other delegations take part at the commemoration marking the Soviet Victory against Nazi Germany, as seen in Bucharest on May 8, 2014. In 2014 Romania commemorates 25 years since the 1989 revolution which brought down Nicolae CeausescuÕs dictatorship.

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    Retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu in front of his one room apartment in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014, charged with torturing and murdering prisoners considered a threat to the country’s old order.

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    Retired Lt. Col. Alexandru Visinescu in front of his one room apartment in Bucharest, Romania, as seen on July 18, 2014. Along with another prison commander Ion Ficior, on trial separately, for the first time since the communism collapsed in Romania 25 years ago, a former prison commander goes on trial Thursday, July 24, 2014,